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Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2014 NYC: Rachel Zoe

For the second showing for designer Rachel Zoe, for Spring/Summer 2014, Moroccanoil Artistic Director Antonio Corral Calero created a gorgeous textured romantic braid/updo.

The inspiration for the show was that of a modern jetset girl going on safari. ‘A traveling muse wearing her femininity with effortless confidence.’

With a color palette of earthy cognacs, khakis and golds and pops of mint and blush, the clothes consisted of polished silhouettes and innovative materials. Corral Calero complemented this look by creating a deconstructed modern take on the braid, inspired by windswept safari days. It was designed to look like it was styled on-the-go and blown free, loose and waved by the elements.

It was achieved by taking random parts of pre-textured strands, crisscrossing them (like macramé) and tucking them into the back and inside of a low braid. Corral Calero’s exact how-to is below.

Hair How-To

“I started with a foundation of Moroccanoil Treatment was first used to create a foundation on dry hair to condition, strengthen and smooth; locks were then sprayed with the new  Moroccanoil Root Boost, starting at the nape, and working up to the roots.

Moroccanoil Molding Cream was used and considered the key product for the look, as it gave it the right semi-matte texture with enough shine.The cream was warmed up in the palms of the hands and applied roots to end.

Hair was next blow dried the hair from underneath and lifted at the roots using the fingers, and letting the hair fall on its own as opposed to pulling or controlling where locks landed.

With hair almost dry, and the model’s head bent over, locks were finger-massaged at the root and lifted to intensify the tangled texture.

Hair was sectioned from ear to ear and pinned while a braid was created with remaining strands at the nape of the neck. Top sections were then released and tucked into different parts of the braid like macramé and blended in waves, creating a loose, inverse-pyramid shape that was wider on top.

To add a tribal vibe, several little braids were placed randomly at the sides.

For the final step, baby hairs around the hairline were pulled out – so they would also move as models walked the runway.

Photography: David Webber for Moroccanoil

 

About the Author

Jolene Turner

In addition to serving as senior editor for American Salon, Jolene Turner is responsible for spearheading the publication's digital media activities. Turner writes and researches topics related to hair and skincare, from new technological advancements to what salon owners are doing to make their businesses a success. Outside of work, Jolene volunteers for the NYC-based non-profit Anjellicle Cats Rescue and writes and performs comedy theater.