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Reason to Celebrate

As you must know by now, we have been celebrating our 130th year in publishing throughout 2007. This month Redken sponsors The Way We Were: 2000–2008, which takes a look at what sets this, the first decade of the new millennium, apart from the other 12 we've covered this year. For me, what comes to mind is the explosion of technology, including the Internet, (and no, Al Gore never claimed he discovered it). If you think back, you may wonder how we ever did business without our computers. And can you even remember a time when we didn't Google everything? Kristine Compton, who works with me in our Los Angeles office, reminded me that when we worked at Premiere magazine together (that's where I found her), I kept my contacts on index cards and spent the day on the phone (a landline, not my cell). Oh, and we used typewriters. Anyone remember those?

Brett Vinovich
Brett Vinovich

Aside from our anniversary, we've also had another reason to celebrate. Thanks to the advertisers who have placed their faith in us, we've had a record year at American Salon. August and September were our biggest issues ever, with 86 and 70 more pages respectively than our nearest competitor, based on information we received from MS Auditor. In fact, from August 2006 through August 2007, we're up 288 pages. No wonder we're the number-one read in the beauty industry. Throughout 2007, we tried to keep the magazine interesting by including gatefolds, a Fashion Week DVD from Redken, CND's Look Book, custom-published magazines from Colomer, inserts from Essie Cosmetics and Paul Mitchell and supplements devoted to education, diversion and going green. The positive response we've gotten from you, our loyal readers, has been phenomenal, which is why we plan to offer even more surprises in 2008. In January, you'll find Portfolio in every issue. Edited by Executive Editor Kelley Donahue, Portfolio will offer an in-depth look at a different company each month. You'll find out what's important to them, what they can offer you and what sets them apart from the competition. We commissioned illustrator David Pflender, who's worked on ad campaigns for Levi Strauss & Co. and Rolex, to create a series of 12 covers. At American Salon, our motto is, "Expect the unexpected." Speaking of which, we're closing out the year with a gatefold on page 32 that celebrates the work of Al Parker, whose idealized illustrations of women in the 1940s and '50s helped shape our notion of female beauty in post-war America. Happy holidays and peace in 2008. —Brett Vinovich, publisher, bvinovich@questex.com

In the December 1944 issue of American Hairdresser, Roux sent a message of peace on earth to our readers that's as fitting today as it was then.
In the December 1944 issue of American Hairdresser, Roux sent a message of peace on earth to our readers that's as fitting today as it was then.


LEFT: One of Al Parker's mother-and-daughter illustrations for Ladies' Home Journal in the 1940s; RIGHT: Our May 1944 cover also featured a mother and daughter.
LEFT: One of Al Parker's mother-and-daughter illustrations for Ladies' Home Journal in the 1940s; RIGHT: Our May 1944 cover also featured a mother and daughter.

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About the Author

Brett Vinovich

Brett Vinovich