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My Chemical Romance

AVEDA

ANTOINETTE BEENDERS, VICE PRESIDENT CREATIVE DIRECTOR

The company's latest collection, Prism, is designed to catch the light and refract a rainbow of shades. "It's a concept that really gets to the heart of what this collection is about: a strong idea of color, seamlessly blended through deceptively intricate cuts and styling techniques," Antoinette Beenders says. Ian Michael Black, artistic director of the Aveda Academy in London, came up with the colors for the collection, using violet hues so there would be a hint of tone in almost every formulation. On Olga, the redhead shown on this page, Black customized Full Spectrum Deep Extra Lift and Deposit Creme Color for Dark Hair with red/violet and ash tones to keep it cool. As the tones got lighter, they became more of an intense pastel shade. "It will definitely open your minds to the myriad ways you can play with color," Beenders says.

The color scheme Ian Michael Black created for Olga, shown here, moved from dark to light.
The color scheme Ian Michael Black created for Olga, shown here, moved from dark to light.

REDKEN

TRACEY CUNNINGHAM, CREATIVE CONSULTANT FOR COLOR

Celebrity colorist Tracey Cunningham is telling her clients to brighten things up a bit and play with their color for spring. For brunettes like Jessica Biel, she's adding a few caramel and honey highlights and making the base a lighter shade. Redheads like Rose McGowan will be going lighter and brighter without being too dramatic. Blondes are a whole other story. "When you're a blonde there are many different ways to play with color without completely changing the base," Cunningham says. "This spring, blondes will add more butterscotch highlights for dimension, while still keeping their base medium blonde rather than platinum."

Tracey Cunningham added butterscotch highlights to Hilary Duff's hair for spring.
Tracey Cunningham added butterscotch highlights to Hilary Duff's hair for spring.

JOICO

SUE PEMBERTON, INTERNATIONAL HAIR COLOR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

For Joico's latest collection, Minimum/Maximum, Sue Pemberton went for maximal impact with minimal foiling. "It's all about placement," she says. For a blonde look, she took a platinum base and injected intentional warmth with just four foils of a lemon-yellow hue. "This creates a huge impact because of the contrasting tones next to each other." Her softer brunette look features face-framing foils of complementary golden blonde and copper highlights. For a redhead, Pemberton would start with cool magentas or purples and add warm copper for subtle highlights that enhance the main color without competing with it. Depending on a client's personal style, Pemberton recommends keeping the same foil placements but adjusting colors to be more or less vibrant. "Even with the same pattern of foils, colors can really change the feeling of the look," she says.

WELLA PROFESSIONALS

JOSH WOOD, GLOBAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR, COLOR

"We are in the dawn of a big color era," Josh Wood says. "People are going to want to see more signature color. It's all about making color look much more bespoke and personalized." Wood uses the new Koleston Perfect range to achieve the looks he loves for spring. The Rich Naturals shades allow him to create an obvious juxtaposition by putting warm toffee browns against intense dark browns, while Deep Browns lets him alternate cool and warm tones for flowing, fluid hair. Wood employs his Color Tides Technique with the Vibrant Reds, taking triangular sections and placing lighter colors at the top and darker hues toward the bottom. All in all, he says, "I think we're in for a lot of color!"

JOHN PAUL MITCHELL SYSTEMS

LINDA YODICE, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

For Linda Yodice, this spring is all about the sheer nuances of dimensional color and tones to achieve a softer, more natural effect. "We are looking for more sheer tonality rather than definite dimension," she says. For blondes, she's seeing organic, "lived-in" highlights versus obvious streaks. "It's like looking at a piece of toffee and seeing the swirls of color," she explains. "We are hand-painting lightener away from the scalp rather than on it." Redheads can attain the same iridescence and sheer tonalities with amber shades or subtle, cool coppers, while chocolate brunettes are going in a new direction with cranberry or berry with violet undertones.

TIGI COLOUR

SUSAN ROBERTS-COOPER, NATIONAL CREATIVE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

According to Susan Roberts-Cooper, a more "definite look" is in for spring. In the new Remix collection, hues were either very cool or very buttery. "We were going for more obvious color that adds excitement," Cooper says. "Blondes were very blonde and redheads were either copper or an almost unnatural red-red." The collection is broken into the three types of clientele: Classic, Glamour and Street. For the Classic client, Cooper recommends highlights that give hair modern elegance and shine, while a Glamour client should get bigger pieces of color applied as slices, not highlights. "It's all about movement created by color," she says. For Street clients, high-contrast colors provide an edgy, experimental look.

A brunette gets buttery highlights in TIGI's Colour With Style collection.
A brunette gets buttery highlights in TIGI's Colour With Style collection.
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About the Author

Lori Morris

Lori Morris