Story of Us, 1930-1940: Lost and Found

Salon owners in the ‘30s were entrepreneurs. As business-minded individuals, they knew it was vital to strengthen their existing client base. Rather than targeting a whole new clientele, they recognized the value of growing from within their existing one. The concept of reactivation campaigns were not lost on them. An article in our January 1931 issue called, “Retrieving the Lost Customer,” advised salon owners the following:

  • The owner or manager should call and find out why the client has been away. If due to a complaint with services rendered, assure the client that the matter will be rectified. If no specific reason is given, have a chat with them—what could it hurt?
  • If the targeted client fails to set an appointment within one week, send a friendly letter reminding them. Enclose a postage-paid appointment card.
  • Send invitations to demonstrations and special service announcements.
  • Be persistent. It’s important to keep your salon’s name before the lost customer. 

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