How to Become an Influencer

Michael Albor engages his social media audience by combining his love for editorial with education.

Gerard Adams, founder of Elite Daily, was a self-made millionaire by age 24. seeking out key factors that turn average people into industry leaders, he discovered seven pillars necessary to become an influencer. Here’s how to apply them in your world.

  1. Trust is earned. People want to know that you can—and will—do what you say you can do. Figure out what your audience wants and create content that speaks to that desire. If you say you do beautiful balayage or killer short cuts, share images of your work to prove it. Bonus: This can also help to attract the type of clients you want to work with.
     
  2. Know your brand and your purpose inside and out. Competition is fierce when trying to win the attention of an audience, so the better you understand what makes you stand out from the crowd, the more confident you can be in sharing it with your followers. Michael Albor (@michaelalborhair), Matrix Artistic Director and owner of The Loft Salon in Boston, is known for amazing editorial styling and coloring, so he combines these skills with his passion for teaching. “I’m doing a lot of how-to videos that you will soon see on Facebook, as well as branding some of my teaching skills on Instagram,” shares Albor. “I love the fact that it doesn’t matter where you live anymore. You can get a great education through social media.”
     
  3. Create value for your audience by inspiring them and showing them new possibilities. Tracey Cunningham (@traceycunningham1), Redken Creative Consultant and owner of Mèche Salon in Los Angeles, boasts nearly 270K followers on Instagram, and it’s not just for pictures of her celebrity clients. Cunningham regularly includes her color formulas in the captions of her posts, which allows stylists to recreate trending tress tints on their own clients.
     
  4. Lady Gaga has her little monsters; Justin Bieber, his Beliebers; and Beyoncé, the Beyhive. Giving your tribe a name builds community and loyalty. Take it further by creating inside jokes and catchphrases, and interacting in a way that gives a sense of belonging. For example, the @unicorntribe has more than 142K followers, and any user can post their unicorn-inspired color creations.  
     
  5. You know the saying: Show, don’t tell. Promote your brand without coming across as arrogant by letting your tribe talk you up. Regram positive pictures and client testimonials to highlight all the good things you want people to know—without having to say them yourself. Blush Salon (@blushlooks) in Newton Square, Pennsylvania does a great job of this on Facebook. The salon reposts images of its stylists’ work and uploads new content like videos of team trainings and photos celebrating stylist promotions to show potential clients the salon’s dedication to excellence.
     
  6. Reach out to other influencers who have a bigger following or who target a different demographic than you and find a way to help each other. “I used Instagram to grow my entire client base by offering complimentary haircuts to select influencers,” reveals Whitney VerMeer (@whitneyvermeer), owner of The Aesthetic x Whitney VerMeer in Minneapolis and editorial stylist for Baxter of California. “In a sense, my client base is as tailored as my haircuts and editorial work.” Another great source for collaboration? American Salon! Add #americansalon to posts of your work, and we may share it with our audience.
     
  7. Keep your audience informed about all the exciting things you’re doing. Teaching a class? Styling a celebrity? Developing a new technique? Share it all with your followers, and engage with them, too. Constance Robbins (@constancerobbins), Matrix Artist and owner of Constance Robbins Studio Loft Salon in Upland, California, has nearly 23K followers on Instagram, but actively responds to comments and questions on her posts. “I’ve been able to share my journey with other hairstylists and inspire them to share their talent with the world by using social media,” Robbins says. “It’s so rewarding to see them blossom.”
     

Many thanks to our sponsors Redken, Pureology, Matrix, L’Oreal Professionnel, Baxter of California, Level Loyalty and Salon Centric for making this digital supplement possible.

Click here to view our digital edition. 

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